Backstage Pass with Lia Chang

Meng Bill to Remove the Term “Oriental” from U.S. Law Passed by Senate; Measure Now Heads to President Obama

 U.S. Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY)

U.S. Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY)

Legislation sponsored by U.S. Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY) that would remove the offensive and outdated term “Oriental” from federal law was unanimously passed last night by the United States Senate. The bill, which was approved by the House of Representatives on February 29 by a vote of 376-0, now heads to President Obama who is expected to sign the measure into law.

Meng’s bill (H.R.4238) would strike all references to “Oriental” – which still appear in Title 42 of the U.S. Code – and replace the word with “Asian Americans.”

“The word ‘Oriental’ is a derogatory and antiquated term and the passage of this legislation will soon force the United States government to finally stop using it,” said Meng. “I thank my colleagues in the House and Senate for understanding that the time has come for our government to no longer refer to Asian Americans – or any ethnicity – in such an insulting manner. Repealing this term is long overdue. ‘Oriental’ no longer deserves a place in federal law, and very shortly it will finally be a thing of the past.”

“‘Orientals’ is an offensive and antiquated term, especially so when referring to America’s vibrant Asian American community,” said U.S. Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA), Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and an original cosponsor of Meng’s bill. “Using this term in federal law lends it a legitimacy it doesn’t deserve. I applaud Congresswoman Meng for her leadership and persistence on this important issue, and look forward to the President joining our efforts to strike these terms from the books.”

“Updating derogatory references in federal law is long overdue,” said U.S. Senator Mazie K. Hirono (D-HI) who sponsored the legislation in the Senate. “Our country’s diversity makes us strong, so it is imperative that this language is changed as soon as possible. I thank my Senate colleagues for joining me in support of all Americans, and Representative Meng for her steadfast advocacy.”

Meng’s bipartisan bill, when it was approved by the House, passed with 76 cosponsors including every member of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC). Click here to view Meng’s speech on the House Floor when it passed the House.

Title 42 of the U.S. Code consists of federal laws that deal with public health, social welfare and civil rights.

In 2009, Meng – when she was a member of the New York State Legislature – passed legislation into law that eliminated the use of “Oriental’ in all official New York State documents.

National Council of Asian Pacific Americans Applauds House Passage of Legislation to Remove Term “Oriental” from Federal Law 

Video: HIDE AND SEEK Starring Lia Chang and Garth Kravits to Screen in 2016 Katra Film Series in New York on May 14; Complete Lineup

Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.

Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits

Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer and co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers,  musicians and corporations. Lia is also an internationally published and exhibited photographer, a multi-platform journalist, and a publicist. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman and Hide and Seek. She is profiled in Examiner.comJade Magazine and Playbill.com.

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