Backstage Pass with Lia Chang

Lia Chang: Portraits of New York Chinatown after 9/11

Selections from the Lia Chang Photography Collection in the AAPI Collection of the Library of Congress include the shell of the World Trade Center and 12 other images that illustrate how New York’s Chinatown, located just ten blocks from Ground Zero, was the largest residential area affected by 9/11. For eight days following the attack on 9/11, Chinatown south of Canal Street was a “frozen zone” in which all vehicular and non-residential pedestrian traffic was prohibited; and, for nearly two months, Chinatown residents and businesses were effectively isolated by the loss of telephone service.

 Flag and the clothesline Photo by Lia Chang

Flag and the clothesline Photo by Lia Chang

The images include walls of the missing at Gouverneur Healthcare Services in Chinatown, memorials in New York Chinatown’s Chatham Square and the FDNY Firehouse in Chinatown, portable phone banks provided by Verizon, and idle workers with no business.

 Shell of the World Trade Center Photo by Lia Chang

Shell of the World Trade Center Photo by Lia Chang

 

Wall of missing at after 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

Wall of missing Gouverneur Healthcare Services after 9-11. Photo by Lia Chang

 

Wall of the missing after 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

Wall of the missing Gouverneur Healthcare Services after 9-11. Photo by Lia Chang

 

Phone lines went down in Chinatown after the World Trade Center towers collapsed. Verizon provided portable phone centers for people to stay connected. Photo by Lia Chang

Phone lines went down in Chinatown after the World Trade Center towers collapsed. Verizon provided portable phone centers for people to stay connected. Photo by Lia Chang

 

Memorial at the FDNY Firestation in Chinatown after 9-11 photo by Lia Chang

Memorial at the FDNY Firestation in Chinatown after 9-11 photo by Lia Chang

 

Memorial in Chatham Square after 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

Memorial in Chatham Square after 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

 

Memorial in Chatham Square after 9-11photo by Lia Chang

Memorial in Chatham Square after 9-11photo by Lia Chang

 

Memorial in the shadow of Confucius Plaza after 9-11Photo by Lia Chang

Memorial in the shadow of Confucius Plaza after 9-11Photo by Lia Chang

The Library of Congress is a central repository for all types of Asian publications that are not broadly available at other locations in the United States. Initiated in 1869 with a gift of 10 works in 934 volumes offered to the United States by the Emperor of China, the Library’s Asian collection of more than 2 million items is the largest and most comprehensive outside of Asia. For more information about the division and its holdings, go to www.loc.gov/rr/asian/.

Business Slows in Chinatown after 9-11. Photo by Lia Chang

Business Slows in Chinatown after 9-11. Photo by Lia Chang

Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution. The Library seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs and exhibitions. Many of the Library’s rich resources can be accessed through its website at http://www.loc.gov and via interactive exhibitions on a personalized website at myLOC.gov.

 Business Slows in Chinatown After 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

Business Slows in Chinatown After 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

 

Business slows in Chinatown after 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

Business slows in Chinatown after 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

 

Business Slows in Chinatown After 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

Business Slows in Chinatown After 9-11 Photo by Lia Chang

Other Articles by Lia Chang:
Celebrating my mom – AN ACTIVE VISION: BEVERLY UMEHARA…LABOR ACTIVIST…1945-1999
Coming to America through The Angel Island Immigration Station
Photos: Edward James Hyland Stars in Lee Blessing’s WORLD PREMIERE A User’s Guide to Hell, Featuring Bernard Madoff At Atlantic Stage II, September 5 – 28, 2013
NYTW Production Photos of Fetch Clay, Make Man: Ray Fisher, Nikki M. James, John Earl Jelks, K. Todd Freeman
John Earl Jelks, Richard Masur, Ray Fisher, Nikki M. James, K. Todd Freeman and More Set for Fetch Clay, Make Man at NYTW, August 23 – October 13, 2013
Photos: Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Phylicia Rashad, John Earl Jelks, Leslie Uggams, Anthony Chisholm, S. Epatha Merkerson, Taraji P. Henson, Jesse L. Martin, Stephen McKinley Henderson, Kenny Leon and More Set for August Wilson American Century Cycle Recording Series at The Greene Space in NY, Aug. 26-Sept. 28, 2013
Celebrity Actress, Pauletta Pearson Washington returns home to North Carolina starring at 2013 National Black Theatre festival with Roscoe Orman (“Sesame Street,” Willie Dynamite) and all star cast in Lorey Hayes’ award-winning “Power Play”, a play about Politics, Passion and The Power of God
Video: Power Play’s Lorey Hayes and Lia Chang on The Carmen Mathis Show
Febone1960.net Review: Power Play Powerful & Suspenseful
Broadwayworld.com Photo Flash: Library of Congress’ IN REHEARSAL Exhibit
broadwayworld.com: Chinglish in Rehearsal
David Henry Hwang’s Chinglish is Broadway Bound this Fall; Goodman Theatre Photo Feature
Photos: Christmas in June w/ Samrat Chakrabarti and Sanjiv Jhaveri’s “Bakwas Bumbug” at The Wild Project in NY
My portrait of “Thom Sesma’s Makeup Transformation into Scar in The Lion King” on view in HHC’s New York City: IN FOCUS, Vol. 2
Multimedia: Exclusive photos and video of Disney’s The Lion King Las Vegas -In the Makeup Chair with Thom Sesma
Andy Warhol, Romare Bearden, Alexander Calder, Lia Chang in Art & Healing Exhibit at Snug Harbor on SI
My Empire State Building at Dusk on view in HHC’s “Art and Healing-Healthy for the Holidays” Art Exhibit
Lia Chang’s Botanical Beauties Portrait Commission at School of Nursing at Kings County Hospital Center
RED opening reception at Gouverneur Healthcare Services
<Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.

Lia Chang. Photo by Thom Sesma

Lia Chang. Photo by Thom Sesma

Lia Chang is an actor, performance and fine art botanical photographer, and an award-winning multimedia journalist. As a photographer and videographer, Chang has been documenting her colleagues and contemporaries in the arts, fashion and journalism since making her stage debut as Liat in the National Tour of South Pacific, with Robert Goulet and Barbara Eden. Chang was featured as Joy in the Signature Theater Company’s revival of Sam Shepard’s 1965 Obie award winning play, Chicago directed by Joseph Chaikin at the Public Theater. Off Broadway credits include: Jeff Weiss’ Obie Award winning Hot Keys (Naked Angels), Raunchy Asian Women (Ohio Theatre), The Confirmation (The Vineyard), Behind Closed Doors (MCC), Power Play (Billie Holiday Theatre), Two Gentlemen of Verona, Underground Soap, and Famine Plays (Cucaracha Theatre). She has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon and Taxman. Chang currently plays Nurse Lia on “One Life to Live”.

Chang’s portraits and performance photos have appeared in Vanity Fair, Gourmet, German Elle, Women’s Wear Daily, The Paris Review, TV Guide, Daily Variety, Interior Design, American Theatre, Broadwayworld.com, Life & Style, OUT, New York Magazine, InStyle, Timeout.com, Villagevoice.com, Playbill.com, Theatermania.com, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The Boston Globe, New York Times and Washington Post.

Selections of Chang’s archive of Asian Pacific Americans in the arts, fashion, journalism, politics and space are now in the newly created LIA CHANG THEATER PORTFOLIO in the ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN PERFORMING ARTS COLLECTION housed in the Library of Congress Asian Division’s Asian American Pacific Islander Collection. Photographs by Lia Chang are in the permanent collections of the Angel Island Immigration Station, Asian American Federation of New York (AAFNY), the Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA) in San Francisco, Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), the New York City Health and Hospital Corporation Art Collection and the New York Historical Society.

A former syndicated arts and entertainment columnist for KYODO News, Chang is the New York Bureau Chief for AsianConnections.com. She writes about culture, style and Asian American issues for a variety of publications and this Backstage Pass with Lia Chang blog.

She is a National Tropical Botanical Garden Environmental Journalism Fellow, a Scripps Howard New Media Fellow at Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism, a Visual Journalism Fellow at the Poynter Institute for New Media and a Western Knight Fellow at USC’s Annenberg College of Communications for Specialized Journalism on Entertainment Journalism in the Digital Age. She is the recipient of the Asian American Journalists Association 2001 National Award for New Media and the Organization of Chinese Americans 2000 Chinese American Journalist Award. Avenue Magazine named her one of the “One Hundred Most Influential Asian Americans” in 1997. She is featured in Joann Faung Jean Lee’s book “Asian American actors: oral histories from stage, screen, and television”.

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